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> Will Any Modern "Normal" Ferrari Be A Classic In The Future?
Jonsav
post Nov 13 2017, 05:17 PM
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almost all my cars are manuals as well. Only my 575 is auto.

manuals all day for me and I'm 31.

I think the majority of people who truly love to drive would take a manual, whatever their age
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dnm7
post Nov 13 2017, 05:35 PM
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QUOTE (Livethedream @ Nov 13 2017, 05:00 PM) *
40 and I have owned 1 car that wasn't a manual. Daily drive a manual through snarling city traffic. Just find it so much more engaging. Not all of us that prefer to row through gears are grandpas.


Manual are fun but annoying day to day usage. It wasn't the same as a Ferrari but my first car 20 years ago in high school was a manaul and what a pain in the ass that was, definitely would have paid $12,000 extra for F1 if I was ordering a new ferrari in 2002. I really cannot believe a 575 manual is $300-400k and an F1, better in every way is literally $100-120k. Unreal.
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dnm7
post Nov 13 2017, 05:37 PM
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QUOTE (Jonsav @ Nov 13 2017, 06:17 PM) *
almost all my cars are manuals as well. Only my 575 is auto.

manuals all day for me and I'm 31.

I think the majority of people who truly love to drive would take a manual, whatever their age


Jonas Im thinking of getting a 575 F1 bc I think they're the most beautiful and prices have come down alot, whats your take on the one you have?
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LV Eric
post Nov 13 2017, 06:27 PM
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Iím 50 and prefer manuals as well. In Europe and the rest of the world most cars are manual, not a problem in or out of traffic for me. I like automatic in luxury cars. Iím having a hard time imagining a Rolls with a stick lol
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Jonsav
post Nov 14 2017, 02:23 AM
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QUOTE (dnm7 @ Nov 13 2017, 09:37 PM) *
Jonas Im thinking of getting a 575 F1 bc I think they're the most beautiful and prices have come down alot, whats your take on the one you have?



I love the looks, prices went up since I bought mine in feb.

The sound is not exactly its strong point, but overall I'm happy with it.
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TeamSalamone
post Nov 15 2017, 01:44 PM
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Driven Specimens are becoming more common. Raris are being sold with 30k miles or even 60k miles (My kinda miles) and some models which may not be "rare" become rare due to the unique colors and specs people are starting to demand from Ferrari.

As a Lawyer I have been involved in some Contracts and negotiations with the sale of the La ThethetheFerrari aperta and let me tell you... demand and prices for these cars (that technically are not to be sold) is climbing to triple sticker ... I just cant believe the prices I'm seeing.

as for the brand... I am totally blown away by Ferrari maintenance and warranty packages ... ive been offered some wild high mileage many years/lifetime warranties with annual or ever 2-3 year re-certs ... I would buy 2 right now except that... I truly do not like anything but Lamborghini. #truth. I had 4 new aventadors each driven to very high miles and I never thought of buying another car... never once.

I think the ThethetheFerrari Aperta will blow away any other modern car as an investment
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JayStyleRacing
post Nov 25 2017, 10:34 PM
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Great conversations.


However, consider in 20-30 years, it'll be harder and more expensive to even get licensing to be able to drive them. I see the government making it more expensive to operat ea non "Zero-emission" vehicle in that life span, just as they are putting pressures on high displacement, low mpg vehicles with various emissons/EPA regulations.


If so, I'd say any V8 and V12 Ferrari has equal future ability for "appreciation" as may be harder to find a V8 in that lifetime. But, again, say in 30 years, where will the auto market be and what regulations will the government have then in the US at least? The cost of regulation could have an adverse impact on collectors in a way we haven't seen yet (as, right now, for many cars 20 years or so, it's relatively fair to get special licensing/registration...). Also, keep in mind while Ferrari collectors will be a small competition, they will be added in the large sea of collectors in general, including folks collecting Corvette's, Camaro's, and various trucks from the same era, and driving more. Expect the government to increase spending to help boost demand for zero-emission vehicles, while also making it more costly to buy the cars we love the most.

What I see as ideal features among collectors are:


#1 Representation of an era, regardless of # of units: I see Stradale's doing well. - We're probably in the final stage of enjoying powerful V8's and definitely larger engines. Just as we've lost the driver experience of sports cars built in the 80ies and so forth (hell the 90ies even), today's experience will be lost to quieter, more automated, models. Which, for me, is not fun.

If you have a clean, low mile, all original F430 you're going to do well. Don't expect it to sell for $1mill, but you could "possibly" break even from the original MSRP price 30 years from now.



#2 Rarity: Obviously ThethetheFerrari, Enzo....the rarest of Ferrari' that are above all others.


The world is pushing away from internal combustion engines in our lifetime (I am 31). It used to make me sad until Tesla, FormulaOne, and McClaren has shown me what's possible with electric and low-to-zero emission vehicles can be engineered to do.

There will always be buyers like me that are adverse to modern vehicles that pretty much operate by themselves. I love nasty, aggressive, gas burning cars that require skill to manage, and are less predictable. Let me get side ways on my own without having to press a stupid button to "kind of" do it.


My .02 cents. (FYI I work in politics and close to policymakers, so I see where the conversation is going. I wanted to keep regulation in mind, as we feel it as car enthusiasts heavily)





--------------------

2013 Audi S5
2006 Trailblazer SS (murdered out)

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Fellippe
post Nov 26 2017, 09:39 AM
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PE


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QUOTE (JayStyleRacing @ Nov 26 2017, 02:34 AM) *
Great conversations.


However, consider in 20-30 years, it'll be harder and more expensive to even get licensing to be able to drive them. I see the government making it more expensive to operat ea non "Zero-emission" vehicle in that life span, just as they are putting pressures on high displacement, low mpg vehicles with various emissons/EPA regulations.


If so, I'd say any V8 and V12 Ferrari has equal future ability for "appreciation" as may be harder to find a V8 in that lifetime. But, again, say in 30 years, where will the auto market be and what regulations will the government have then in the US at least? The cost of regulation could have an adverse impact on collectors in a way we haven't seen yet (as, right now, for many cars 20 years or so, it's relatively fair to get special licensing/registration...). Also, keep in mind while Ferrari collectors will be a small competition, they will be added in the large sea of collectors in general, including folks collecting Corvette's, Camaro's, and various trucks from the same era, and driving more. Expect the government to increase spending to help boost demand for zero-emission vehicles, while also making it more costly to buy the cars we love the most.

What I see as ideal features among collectors are:


#1 Representation of an era, regardless of # of units: I see Stradale's doing well. - We're probably in the final stage of enjoying powerful V8's and definitely larger engines. Just as we've lost the driver experience of sports cars built in the 80ies and so forth (hell the 90ies even), today's experience will be lost to quieter, more automated, models. Which, for me, is not fun.

If you have a clean, low mile, all original F430 you're going to do well. Don't expect it to sell for $1mill, but you could "possibly" break even from the original MSRP price 30 years from now.



#2 Rarity: Obviously ThethetheFerrari, Enzo....the rarest of Ferrari' that are above all others.


The world is pushing away from internal combustion engines in our lifetime (I am 31). It used to make me sad until Tesla, FormulaOne, and McClaren has shown me what's possible with electric and low-to-zero emission vehicles can be engineered to do.

There will always be buyers like me that are adverse to modern vehicles that pretty much operate by themselves. I love nasty, aggressive, gas burning cars that require skill to manage, and are less predictable. Let me get side ways on my own without having to press a stupid button to "kind of" do it.


My .02 cents. (FYI I work in politics and close to policymakers, so I see where the conversation is going. I wanted to keep regulation in mind, as we feel it as car enthusiasts heavily)


Nice post.

Where the hell have you been? shock.gif
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dnm7
post Nov 26 2017, 09:05 PM
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Whats most intriguing to me is have you guys seen the production numbers on things like a jaguar E type? Over 30,000 made. If you look at the 300 SL mercedes between roadster and coupe almost 4000 were made. These Ferraris from the 90s/00s that havent really appreciated like say the 512 testarossa or the 575M were both made in quantities right around 2000 units total and both have way way way more performance than either the 300SL or the jaguar E type. I just think cars appreciate alot when the kids who would dream of them could finally afford them. The scarcity or lack thereof with things like jaguar E type or 1960s american muscle cars is crazy when you look at their values and compare to these 90s/00s Ferraris that are actually way way rarer.
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