Jump to content

LED Lighting


sprite
 Share

Recommended Posts

I read an article stating that LED lighting is likely to take over in households. New technology allows white LED to be used in settings where traditionally lightbulbs would be used, lasting up to 100.000hours and only using 1-4 watts of power. Anyone have any more info? Any companies that might get a massive boost if this really takes of?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read an article stating that LED lighting is likely to take over in households. New technology allows white LED to be used in settings where traditionally lightbulbs would be used, lasting up to 100.000hours and only using 1-4 watts of power. Anyone have any more info? Any companies that might get a massive boost if this really takes of?

 

Kind of old news really.. But maybe Hella, Osram and/or Bosch get a boost from it in say, ten years from nowm when it is cheap enough for the main public?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My buddy is heading a LED light company start up.... We are trying to get products in Lowes and OSH stores now... They are also teaming up with some builders in the sun states to use there LED as an option on new home construction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LEDs have been around for ages. They just don't put out much light. You would need a massive rack of them to put out the same amount of light as a simple 60W. They are great for special applications. But I don't see them lighting home interiors any time soon.

 

Here's a LED light panel I have used before for video production. Look at the demo video at the bottom. Notice how big the panel is, and how that's hardly enough light to highlight someones face, let alone a room.

 

http://dvcreators.net/litepanels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a LED light panel I have used before for video production. Look at the demo video at the bottom. Notice how big the panel is, and how that's hardly enough light to highlight someones face, let alone a room.

 

http://dvcreators.net/litepanels

 

That's the big issue with it, sadly. LED lights can easily be used for things like torches, desk lamps etc, but to get enough light to really brighten a room, would need a HUGE LED bank. The only way I can see that working, barring a great advance in LED technology as it stands, is to be able to essentially have the ceiling and/or walls giant LED or OLED screens, so that the entire surface is emitting light. At the moment, though, that sort of thing is prohibitively expensive .We had to do a bit of research on a related topic for a physics class I took last year, and we determined you could do it, but it would increase the cost of an average 3 bedroom home by a factor of nearly 6. However like all things the cost of the newer technologies falls, and once OLED and FOLED technologies become affordable to create in larger scales then it's a distinct possibility.

 

Ever seen any futuristic movies where rooms just seem to glow and be bright without any obvious lights? That's what I'd expect, but I think its at least 5 - 8 years away if not more. Small scale such panels, are very near (2 - 3 years probably).

 

But at present, to make an LED panel with that sort of intensity and dispersion would probably be less efficient than a fluorescent lighting system, althoguh it would be easier on the eyes.

 

But, the steps in between have to be taken, as I said above desk lamps and other targetted-area low range lights are a brilliant starting point with traditional LED units.

 

I could also see, short term, LED panels being used in low-light situations, as they are typically more efficient than traditional types of bulb - think movie theatres and such places where 95% of the time you want dim but usable light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some LED lights in my flat, they are used for mood or ambient lighting. they are usefull for specialist applications, The ones I have are housed under the wall units of a kichen to provide downlighting (this is usefull as the base of the unit is way less than 1inch in depth and using LEDs means you can hide the light in the base of the unit without having to have a light housing being visible. I also have some in a floor to allow uplighting against a wall. The floor LEDs are covered by magnified glass lenses which helps the light intensify and spread, again, the size of the units makes this a good application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 6 years later...

My company is doing a ton of work for a huge lighting conglomerate ($2 billion annual revenue) and they're getting traction at the government/infrastructure level for their new LED products. They're selling LED roadway, tunnel, and security lights to DOTs and muni/local governments all over the country. NYC just announced their plans to replace all of their street lights with LEDs.

 

We all know LEDs run for 100,000 hours or more and that they draw way less power but there's a new wrinkle to the story that will make them even more desirable. The technology has progressed to allow them to be dimmed to about 10% of their full brightness remotely via ROAM or similar remote control or automated system. In other words, there will no longer be "off" and "on" for highway lights, street lights, parking lot lights, etc. At dusk, you might see them come on to 30% brightness, growing brighter as the sun dips below the horizon. Imagine places like car dealerships which will be able to light their lots all night, but reduce the illumination substantially after 1AM or a predetermined time. I can even imagine motion-sensing technology being brought to outdoor spaces like you see in some public facilities (restrooms light up when you walk in, why not a parking lot when you drive in?) This will save a ton of money through the energy savings and reduced wear on the luminaries and it will also look and feel better for the end-user.

 

The other thing is that they're able to hit massive lumen output with fewer and fewer LEDs. One of the products we're producing a promo video about has an output of up to 42,000 lumens (!) with just a handful of LEDs, I think no more than 12 of them if memory serves.

 

I think LED has hit critical mass. It's going to explode in the next 24 months. The intersection of attractive new features, energy and maintenance cost reduction, and affordable price point has been reached enough for governments to take interest. That's going to be the boom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My company is doing a ton of work for a huge lighting conglomerate ($2 billion annual revenue) and they're getting traction at the government/infrastructure level for their new LED products. They're selling LED roadway, tunnel, and security lights to DOTs and muni/local governments all over the country. NYC just announced their plans to replace all of their street lights with LEDs.

 

We all know LEDs run for 100,000 hours or more and that they draw way less power but there's a new wrinkle to the story that will make them even more desirable. The technology has progressed to allow them to be dimmed to about 10% of their full brightness remotely via ROAM or similar remote control or automated system. In other words, there will no longer be "off" and "on" for highway lights, street lights, parking lot lights, etc. At dusk, you might see them come on to 30% brightness, growing brighter as the sun dips below the horizon. Imagine places like car dealerships which will be able to light their lots all night, but reduce the illumination substantially after 1AM or a predetermined time. I can even imagine motion-sensing technology being brought to outdoor spaces like you see in some public facilities (restrooms light up when you walk in, why not a parking lot when you drive in?) This will save a ton of money through the energy savings and reduced wear on the luminaries and it will also look and feel better for the end-user.

 

The other thing is that they're able to hit massive lumen output with fewer and fewer LEDs. One of the products we're producing a promo video about has an output of up to 42,000 lumens (!) with just a handful of LEDs, I think no more than 12 of them if memory serves.

 

I think LED has hit critical mass. It's going to explode in the next 24 months. The intersection of attractive new features, energy and maintenance cost reduction, and affordable price point has been reached enough for governments to take interest. That's going to be the boom.

 

I am working with LEDs on my project, I can use some insight. Ill call you in the AM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think my parents just replaced there multiple small lights in the kitchen ceiling with LEDs (I think). Bright as shit and they said it was something like $60 each.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just put in a single recessed can LED above our bathtub when we had our bathroom renovated last winter. In a complete demo and remodel, that was one of the best upgrades we made. Hadnt realized how dark it was behind that curtain until it went in. :icon_mrgreen: We had granite installed in our kitchen as well so we'll be doing under-cabinet LED's in there as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...