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Found 23 results

  1. So as not to hijack Stimpy's great thread on the front power steering hose replacement, here is my video of replacing the rear power steering hoses by the lift block and reservoir. Additionally it shows replacing the alternator cooling hose. All parts used are also detailed.
  2. It was a battle of strategy, perfection, mixed with good fortune and fuel strategy that brought the #11 Grasser Racing Team its latest victory at the Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring. The GRT GT3 Huracán gave both the Italian automotive manufacturer and Austrian team the unofficial “36 Hours of Florida” honors with its successive victories at the Daytona 24 Hours and again in Sebring for the GTD class. Team Principal Gottfried Grasser said, “I’m simply lost for words. Our success rate in the American races is 100 percent with three wins in a row. The race itself was extremely turbulent with many ups and downs. We extended our last three stints by a good margin and our drivers saved fuel where possible, which enabled us to stick to our strategy and we didn’t have to make another stop.” Driver Mirko Bortolotti, with teammates Rolf Ineichen and Rik Breukers piloted through the checkered flag in P1 ahead of competitor Magnus Racing’s Huracán. It was a 1-2 win for Lamborghini as the GT3 Huracán proves to be a venerable competitor. “I would like to especially thank Rolf Ineichen,” continued Grasser. “[W]ho pushed incredibly hard, Mirko Bortolotti, who has no equal when he’s behind the wheel and Rik Breukers, who also turned in an impeccable performance. And, of course, the entire team deserves my utmost respect. For twelve hours, they did not make a single mistake. Every move was dead right and every stop perfect from start to finish. I am incredibly proud of the whole team, and last but not least, many thanks to Squadra Corse Lamborghini, who backed us wonderfully well at this demanding track right from the very first tests. The support we’ve received from Lamborghini is just awesome. Everyone worked well together in this thrilling race.” With less than two hours, Bortolotti climbed from fifth to the first position staving off a last-ditch effort by Andy Lally of Magnus Racing who would finish in second with his teammates Spencer Pumplley and John Potter. A late-in-the-race yellow condition inadvertently allowed the Grasser team to conserve much-needed fuel for the last of the race. “What a race! Winning Sebring, one of the toughest races on the entire calendar, is just amazing,” said driver Mirko Bortolotti. “The last two hours were the toughest of my whole career. First off, I outbraked Andy Lally in the first turn, and then after that, he stuck to my bumper for an hour and a half until we reached the finish line. The slightest mistake would have been enough to lose us the win, and what’s more, I really needed to save fuel but wanted to secure victory more than anything. Hats off to everyone in the team! I’m really proud of every one of them.” Stefano Domenicali, CEO of Automobili Lamborghini, said: "After an extraordinary 2018, the new year has started in the best possible way. Winning the 12 Hours of Sebring for the second time in a row underlines the indisputable qualities of the Huracán GT3 project. This is a great success for the entire Lamborghini team."
  3. As we've seen the past couple of days, information and news of the Huracan EVO spyder have dropped ahead of its public reveal at the Geneva Motorshow here next week. Here is a monstrous collection of Press images of the new car. Looks sharp and no doubt an absolute winner in the warmer climates. Press Release Text will follow the images: TEXT: New Lamborghini Huracán EVO design translated into open-air exhilaration Electrohydraulic, lightweight soft top for pure Spyder feeling Aerodynamic superiority maintained roof up or down Engine derived from Huracán Performante, producing 640 hp and 600 Nm of torque Acceleration 0-100 km/h in 3.1 seconds, top speed 325 km/h New infotainment system with advanced connectivity features Sant’Agata Bolognese, 26 February 2019 – Automobili Lamborghini presents the new Lamborghini Huracán EVO Spyder at Geneva Motor Show: the open-top car joins its coupé counterpart launched earlier this year, as the second model in the V10 Huracán EVO line-up. The Spyder adopts the next-generation vehicle dynamic control and aerodynamics developed for the coupé, with the 5.2 liter naturally-aspirated Lamborghini V10 engine uprated for a higher power output and incorporating Titanium intake valves. The Huracán EVO Spyder outputs 640 hp (470 kW) at 8,000 rpm with 600 Nm of torque delivered at 6,500 rpm. With a dry weight of 1,542 kg the car reaches a weight-to-power ratio of 2.41 kg/hp, accelerates from 0-100 km/h in 3.1 seconds and from 0-200 km/h in 9.3 seconds. Braking from 100 km/h to 0 is achieved in just 32.2 m, with a top speed of 325 km/h. “The Huracán EVO Spyder incorporates all the performance, next-generation vehicle control and aerodynamic features of the EVO coupé, with its own unique personality and a driving excitement that only an open-top car can offer,” says Stefano Domenicali, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Automobili Lamborghini. “The Spyder continues the Huracán EVO’s evolutionary charge: extremely easy to drive while excelling as a highly responsive, fun super sports car. Particularly with the roof open, the emotive sound of the naturally aspirated engine and the refined, lightweight exhaust system take the sensory experience to a new level. The Huracán EVO Spyder’s design, performance and exhilarating open-air drive experience is literally breath-taking.” Next generation vehicle dynamics The Huracán EVO Spyder combines the option of open-air driving with the prowess of the Huracán EVO’s evolutionary technologies. Rear-wheel steering and a four-wheel torque vectoring system are controlled centrally by Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI): the Central Processing Unit integrating and controlling every aspect of the car’s set-up and dynamic behavior, anticipating the next move and needs of the driver and interpreting this through a ‘feed forward logic’. Processing data in real time, the LDVI system monitors and analyses external conditions through its active suspension and all-wheel drive. It also recognizes the driver’s intentions through steering wheel, braking, acceleration, the gear and driving mode selected. Precise inputs are given to the vehicle dynamic system, creating a super-agile and responsive car with unparalleled level of control: the car doesn’t just react, but predicts the best driving set-up for the next moment. Lamborghini Piattaforma Inerziale (LPI) version 2.0, launched on the EVO coupé, is a comprehensive set of accelerators and gyroscope sensors located in the car’s center of gravity, monitoring real-time lateral, longitudinal and vertical accelerations, as well as roll, pitch and yaw rate. The magneto rheological suspension, also upgraded to version 2.0, instantaneously adapts the damping following inputs from the LPI. The new advanced traction control system together with enhanced all-wheel drive and torque vectoring, allows traction to be directed to a single wheel as required. Modified Lamborghini Dynamic Steering (LDS), provides higher responsiveness in corners while requiring the lowest steering angles. Coupled with rear-wheel steering, agility is ensured at low speed with maximum stability in high-speed cornering and under severe braking. Driving the Huracán EVO Spyder is as refined or exciting as the occupants desire. The preferred driving mode is selected via the ANIMA system, with STRADA especially calibrated via the LDVI system for road-driving comfort. In SPORT it adopts a fun and exciting persona, with the ability to drift. In CORSA the Huracán EVO Spyder demonstrates its Performante heritage: race-track ready and exhilarating, for the most extreme driving environments. Open-air aerodynamics and design – inside and out The aerodynamic superiority of the Huracán EVO is continued with the Spyder. With roof either up or down, the aerodynamic competency of the EVO Spyder, with more than five times the downforce and efficiency of the original Huracán Spyder, sustains not only the most dynamic handling and performance but the comfort of the occupants. Cabin airflow is minimised and the occupants assured a quiet cockpit environment. Like the EVO coupé, a new front bumper gives the car a low, assertive personality with aerodynamic efficiency improved via the front splitter and enlarged air intakes. At the rear the Huracán EVO Spyder adopts the new rear design evocative of naked race bikes and inspired by Lamborghini Huracán race cars, with the twin outlets of the new sports exhaust system positioned high in the rear bumper. At the upper end of the tail an integrated, slotted spoiler provides enhanced air flow, clearly emphasizing the car’s aerodynamic abilities. The underbody has been shaped to maximize aerodynamic efficiency. The side profile of the Huracán EVO Spyder differs significantly from the coupé, but is equally dynamic with roof up or down. The lightweight soft top carves the top line of the Spyder’s silhouette while up, and is hidden away when down in the most efficient space possible, revealing the athletic and equally powerful lines of the open car. Automatic pop-up safety bars are hidden away. Whether the roof is up or down, the driver can electronically open the rear window, which functions as a windshield when closed and when open, amplifies the song of the EVO Spyder’s unique aspirated engine sound. The electrohydraulic, lightweight soft top opens via a button positioned on the central tunnel in just 17 seconds up to a driving speed of 50 km/h (31 mph). As the roof silently lowers, two fins in the same color as the body rise upwards out of the folding roof casing towards the seatbacks and once in place continue the line to the rear, enhancing the car’s low, dynamic appearance. An integrated duct between the fins reduces turbulence in the headroom during open top driving. The Huracán EVO Spyder is presented in Verde Selvans: an iconic new Lamborghini four-layer green, and one of an enhanced range of colors and trims available for the Huracán EVO coupé and Spyder. Interior options include new EVO trim in Alcantara and leather mix, with stitching and trim details to match the body tone. A number of style packages are offered as well as lightweight materials such as Carbon Forged Composite and Lamborghini’s patented Carbon Skin. Lamborghini’s comprehensive customization program, Ad Personam, allows virtually limitless personalization of the new car. The EVO Spyder sports the new 20” Aesir rims, with Pirelli P Zero tires. The new 8.4” HMI touchscreen, located in the center console just above the start button, puts connectivity at the driver’s fingertips, with multi-finger gesture control. Governing car functions including seats, climate and the status of the LDVI system in real-time it also puts all infotainment, such as Apple CarPlay with smartphone integration, at the cabin occupants’ disposal. A multimedia system incorporates connected navigation and entertainment including web radio and video player, with the intuitive interface enabling voice commands. Price of the Lamborghini Huracán EVO Spyder and market delivery The first customers will take delivery of the new Lamborghini Huracán EVO Spyder in spring 2019 at suggested retail prices as follows: Europe EUR 202,437 (suggested retail price taxes excluded) UK GBP 181,781 (suggested retail price taxes excluded) USA USD 287,400 (suggested retail price taxes/GST excluded) China RMB 3,650,000 (suggested retail price taxes included) Japan YEN 32,827,602 (suggested retail price taxes excluded) Technical Data - Lamborghini Huracán EVO Spyder CHASSIS AND BODY Chassis Hybrid chassis made from aluminum and carbon fiber Body shell Outer skin made from aluminum and composite material, High quality soft top Suspension Aluminum double-wishbone suspension Springs and dampers Steel springs and hydraulic dampers. “MagneRide” electromagnetic damper control Electronic Stability Control (ESC) ESC/ABS characteristics can be adjusted via ANIMA, ESC can be deactivated Steering Electromechanical power steering, LDS steering with variable steering ratio Brakes Hydraulic dual-circuit brake system with vacuum brake servo unit, 6-piston aluminum calipers at the front, 4-piston aluminum calipers at the rear Brake discs Carbon-ceramic discs, ventilated and cross-drilled ∅ 380 x 38 mm front, ∅ 356 x 32 mm rear Tires (standard) Pirelli P Zero 245/30 R20 (front) – 305/30 R20 (rear) Wheels (standard) 8.5J x 20'' (front) – 11J x 20'' (rear) Mirrors Electrically controlled exterior mirrors Airbags Full size dual-stage front airbags. Full size lateral airbags. Knee airbags in specific markets. ENGINE Type Ten-cylinder V, 90°, IDS+MPI dual injection Displacement 5204 cm3 (317.57 cu in) Bore / stroke Ø 84,5 mm x 92,8 mm (3.33 x 3.65 in) Valve control Intake and exhaust camshafts with continually variable adjustment Compression 12.7 : 1 Max. power 470 kW / 640 hp at 8,000 rpm Max. torque 600 Nm (442 lb. ft.) at 6,500 rpm Emissions class EURO 6 – LEV 3 Exhaust treatment Two catalysts with lambda regulation Cooling system Water and oil cooling systems Engine Management Bosch MED 17 Master Slave Lubrication Dry sump DRIVETRAIN Type Electronically controlled all-wheel drive system (Haldex Gen. V) with rear mechanical self-locking differential Transmission 7-speed LDF dual-clutch transmission, shift characteristics variable via ANIMA Clutch Double plate clutch ∅ 187 mm (7.36 in) PERFORMANCE Top Speed 325 km/h 0–100 km/h 3.1 s 0–200 km/h 9.3 s Braking (100-0 km/h) 32,2 m DIMENSIONS Wheelbase 2,620 mm (103.15 in) Length 4,520 mm (177.95 in) Width 1,933 mm (76.10 in) Width (incl. ext. mirrors) 2,236 mm (88.03 in) Height 1,180 mm (46.46 in) Track front 1,668 mm (65.67 in) Track rear 1,620 mm (63.78 in) Turning circle 10.9 m Weight (dry) 1,542 kg (3,400 lb) Weight/power 2.41 kg/hp (5.29 lb/CV) Weight Distribution 43 % (front) – 57 % (rear) CAPACITIES Fuel 83 liters Trunk 100 liters CONSUMPTION The fuel consumption and emissions data is in the type approval stage.
  4. Lamborghini Club America (join if you aren't a member!) shot out an email yesterday. Apparently, there is going to be an incredible event in Japan this spring! The Concorso &Tour d'Eleganza Kyoto is taking place April 13-14. Lamborghini corporate is picking up the tab (Concorso Display and entrance tickets) for selected participants! The Club put together a great slide show with the details and shipping information estimates and all the details if you are at all interested. Lamborghini Club Kyoto Program Information and Application If you want to look at the official site, use this link. Judging from the Lamborghini day in Japan this year, participants can expect a warm reception and plenty of excitement on the drive, it looks incredible. Lamborghini Day in Japan Gallery:
  5. Hi All, I'd like to share my 2018 Concept I did of the legendary Countach. It has been written about by many online automotive websites the last 7 days. Sites from the States, France, Turkey, Japan, Russia, China, Singapore, Belgium, Hungry and Australia. Hope you like it Side note, anyone willing to invest let me know as there are current plans to build this baby! I have filed for copyright on the design too. Allan Special - Actually not true, I will be doing a side skirted version for side skirt lovers... https://www.facebook.com/JnVisuals/ook.com/JnVisuals/.com/JnVisuals/
  6. One of the things I want to see more of is some vintage love here. I know that's not always an easy bill to foot, but this Petrolicious film makes it so easy. If you've been around the brand a while, you've almost assuredly heard of Jack Riddell and his 400GT. It's of legend, with over 200,000 miles on it, this is one of the most storied 400GT's. One of the nicest guys out there and a great ambassador for the vintage community and brand. Bravo to him for driving it as it should be. I know the video is a few years old now, but it needed to be shared again. Check it out!
  7. Apparently, Iceland has become a bit of a hipster's paradise lately. Despite that, Lamborghini took a gaggle of Urus' (Uri?) to the island to do some adventure driving. They put together some cool videos and some great photography. I've read some recent reviews (Car and Driver) and they gush about the ute's ability in the snow and terrain. It's pretty neat to see. Check out the visual goodness below. Who will be the first to put a snorkel and light bar on theirs?! 524239.mp4 524240.mp4
  8. The Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Indio and, greater Coachella Valley area has itself a new authorized Lamborghini dealership. Say hello to Rancho Mirage, the seventh SoCal location and 38th Lamborghini dealership in the United States. Celebrated this week, the new store-front is a new look for the company. Myself, I dig the look. It feels like exactly what I'd expect a high-end business in the area to look and feel like. I love the clean look and feel, very modern Palm Springs to me. They even have a dedicated Ad Personom studio. It seems that the Urus is giving the company a great victory lap, especially with promoting the new dealership. If you've been following social media they were doing a Dynamic Launch with multiple publications in the area during the grand opening. It will be cool to see if they included the festivites in any videos that pop up here shortly.
  9. Hey guys! I thought it would be a good idea to start a discussion thread about the upcoming facelifted Huracán. Rumors, spottings, information and all that is welcome! Let's kick it off with a rumor I heard. A source told me the car will be released this month ...
  10. I’ll be honest, I’m not his primary demographic, but the Stradman seems to be a genuinely good guy who is making it good for himself. I love to see that. This is the video of him picking up his new-to-him 2012 Aventador. It’s nice to see that genuine excitement and passion when getting a dream come true. Check it out! Even better, he surprises a nine-year old fan that suffers from brittle bone disease by picking him up at school! Coolest thing I watched today. Glad to see his genuine outreach. Major kudos!
  11. It's always good to see different perspectives and angles. I missed this one, but in September Speedhunters Editor-in-Cheif Paddy McGrath visited the factory and met with Lamborghini's Head of Whole Vehicle Development Dr. Rouven Mohr. It's a lengthy, but great read on behind the scenes and the people that make the brand what it is and what it will become. Why Lamborghini Matters in 2018 - via Speedhunters
  12. A pretty awesome look at the factory of the Aventador S line, as well as a look at the Urus production! Gone are the days of drinking wine on the production line for lunch!
  13. A truly beautiful take on a fetching car. The visuals alone are worth the time. Check it out below.
  14. I enjoy this guys channel, some of it is over the top, but that’s the nature of YouTube. He does some awesome charity stuff as well, so happy to share his videos. Check out this one from a rally in Dubai where they get a Huracán to go vs. a Urus.
  15. I would like to try something new with the board here. Per the title suggests, we are looking for volunteers who would like create some original content on the new and improved Lambo Power 2.0. What makes our forum unique is that the community here is active and vocal. For the past 14 years if you’ve been looking for Lamborghini enthusiasts, who are experienced, unabashed and sometimes outspoken, you came here. With that in mind, we want to share your stories that involve Lamborghini, its products and lifestyle; and that’s where you can help, if you want! There are many talented individuals here with writing, photography, video and many other theaters. So what do we want? A few things: You should be passionate about some aspect of the Lamborghini brand You should want to tell a story Have fun and use your own voice No prior experience necessary. You don’t have to own a Lamborghini That’s it. At this point I’m just looking for people to raise their hand and say whether they are interested and what they’d like to do. It doesn’t have to be a written story, although it can be. It doesn’t have to be a video short, although those are always welcome. It can be a photo collection of a drive event, it can be a written story about the complications of getting gas in a Lamborghini in a small town, or a favorite story from a rally with friends. Had a chance to drive a new car at the dealership and want to share your thoughts? Perfect! Heading to an event with fellow enthusiasts? Great, snag some pictures or video, put down some words and lets get you published! The possibilities are endless! And it doesn’t have to be a ton of work, however much or little you want. We just want to bolster our neck of the woods for unique-to-Lambo Power content. This place is your online home away from home, so help make it you own. Have a place to share, and a place to enjoy. So if anyone is interested, just drop a note below and let me know what you’d like to do. I’ll be in touch and we’ll go from there.
  16. Despite the cars foibles, looks like a fun drive in this video. I’ve aleays had a soft spot for the Espada, check it out below!
  17. As much hate that gets dolled out on Shmee150, I watched some videos and dont mind him. He’s got some good stuff. This latest is his look at some very rare Lamborghinis one display at the factory right now. Worth a watch!
  18. Link: https://autoweek.com/article/car-reviews/2018-lamborghini-huracan-performante-spyder-first-drive-king-curves 2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante Spyder first drive: King of curves The omnivore of mountain roads will not be satisfied July 31, 2018 You often can have too much of a good thing. Ice cream (stomachache), praise (overinflated self-esteem), money (not caring about your fellow human). But perfect, endless, traffic-free winding roads? There is no amount large enough. Proof comes from this seven-speed, paddle-shifted, all-wheel-drive 640-hp Lamborghini Huracan Performante convertible. No amount of hours spent behind the wheel can make this car feel pedestrian. Whether the corner is short or long, on camber, off -- no matter, this $308,859 Spyder will challenge you to take the next one faster. Even after spending hours on nothing but curvy roads. It’s almost zen-like. I’m clicking the giant, pressed carbon-fiber paddles between third and fourth gear, swapping focus between the yellow line to the left, the mountainside to my right and the road ahead, 100 percent concentration. The penalty for losing it ranges from an Italian reprimand to certain death. That, I think, is what really excites people about these hyper-focused cars: the concentration. On a normal day, you’re watching TV, checking your email, playing with the kids. Even when you’re driving, you’re thinking about what you have to do when you get home, the next day at work, thet weekend. In the cockpit-like cabin of the Huracan Performante Spyder, there’s no time for stray thoughts. The exterior is more of the same. The mind thinks of only one thing: speed. I mean, look at it. Instead of making roadkill, the sharp beak would just fillet the skin off a beast and then separate it with the rear bodywork. It’s so red (Rosso Mars) that the speed limit signs catch a reflection off the sun and look pink while passing by. But the coolest part of the body is its active aerodynamics. Lamborghini’s ALA (Aerodinamica Lamborghini Attiva) system can adjust downforce independently front-to-rear, and side-to-side in the rear. You may remember this from our Performante coupe drive last year. Electrically actuated flaps open and close in the front underspoiler, for extra downforce or less drag, depending on the situation. The rear wing stays fixed, but flaps on each side can increase or decrease downforce by feeding air through a channel to help you around a corner. As the weight loads up to the left around a right-hander, for instance, it can reduce pressure on that side to balance the body. It’s less complicated than an active rear wing, with fewer moving parts, says Lamborghini. All the better to take the next corner faster, says the little devil on my left shoulder. The Execution The Performante Spyder weighs 77 pounds less than its standard Huracan counterpart. That, along with the 30 extra hp and 40 lb-ft of torque garned from a new intake, exhaust and tuning, makes the 5.2-liter V10 good for 640 hp and 443-lb-ft of torque. That puts its weight-to-power ratio at 5.2 pounds per horsepower, sticking it between the Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 (4.7:1) and Porsche 911 Turbo S (6.1:1). It’ll scoot to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds, 124 mph in 9.3 seconds and has a top speed of 202 mph. On startup it barks loudly, before settling into a metallic thrum of engine noise. That’s before I goose the right pedal to wake up the neighborhood in northern California, where I’m testing this curve-hungry monster. The cabin is significantly wild, even for a Lamborghini. The company uses “forged” carbon fiber for the vents, center console, wing and other bits, which is basically the plywood of carbon fiber. It has sort of a weird, marble look that I thought was a design choice at first -- this is a Lamborghini after all. Then I found out that it's cheaper and easier to mold than the more common carbon weave. All of the buttons look like jet-fighter controls, and the ignition looks like it’s made for launching missiles. Like Ferrari, Lamborghini puts all controls on the steering wheel, including turn signals and drive mode changes. The gauge cluster is customizable with navigation, radio and Apple CarPlay screens, but when it goes into Corsa mode it becomes a big digital tach with a giant gear number in the center. I think there’s a speedo on there too, but I didn’t have enough time to break my concentration to look. Left, right, left, left, downshift, upshift, left, right, left, ad nauseum. It’s not huge inside; my driving partner was a 6-plus-footer, which put his head nearly into the soft top. With it retracted (a 17-second operation), he got a nice windblown coiffure. Hairpieces, be warned. Like the Audi R8, the pedalbox is narrow, which means your left foot, with nothing to do, just sits there trying not to impede the right one. Laying down the power is easy with the Haldex Gen. V all-wheel-drive system. Flattening the pedal, the Performante Spyder takes a split second to get going, but with 70 percent of the torque available at 1,000 rpm, it’s only a moment. After that, it belts out a V10-Lamborghini scream. It’s a mix of weed whipper, didgeridoo and jet ski and it’s a lower pitch than you might imagine -- more along the lines of McLaren’s 4.0-liter than Ferrari’s 3.9 V8. Shifts are vicious in corsa mode, perfectly aggressive in sport and seamless in strada (street). Actually, in strada the whole car calms and quiets down. You can almost drive it like a normal car. Strada noise levels also allow for conversation with the top down. In sport and corsa I have to let off the accelerator when making a point. I would say it gets a little drone-y in those upper modes, but I’m so concentrated on the next 12 corners that it’s hard to notice. I get faster later in the morning as the corners get tighter, but the Performante never slips or slides. The rear end just sticks harder the quicker I go with the ALA system keeping everything balanced. I drove a hardtop Huracan on an autocross course a few years ago, and was stunned at how sharp it was at slow speeds. This one is equally stunning, but at three times those autocross speeds. After three hours of driving those perfect mountain roads, I skipped lunch and got back in the cockpit for another hour. This car is hungry for curves, and it makes the driver that way too. I only returned to get my stuff out of the hotel room before checkout. Unfortunately I missed it, and it was already in turnover mode after my private jaunt. Speaking of luggage, the front trunk fits two backpacks, and that’s it. A carry-on-sized bag would need soft sides to squeeze in. If you’re taking a road trip, bring a support vehicle. Fatigue? I never feel any. I do, however, sleep well that night with my body drained of every ounce of adrenaline that it could produce. Still, I was depressed in the morning not to be able to get four or six more hours in the mountains. I just can’t see getting sick of it, ever. One thing that isn’t present here, as opposed to the Lamborghini Aventador and Urus, is Ego mode. That is an individual setup where suspension, transmission and throttle can be adjusted independently of each other. For example, here in Michigan I would put the suspension in street mode and the transmission and throttle mapping in race. Even though I was hoping to see flames spitting out of the dual rear exhaust at wide open throttle, we didn’t get to drive at night. However, even during the day, the inside of the tips, when the loud flaps are open, glow bright red. Red enough to see in broad daylight in the shade. I’m surprised there wasn’t a little “don’t touch” placard on the back bumper. The Takeway My inner 12-year-old wants to say I would drive this car every day, all the time, as long as I lived near roads like this. My inner 60-year-old thinks I would get my license taken away in four seconds. The real answer is probably somewhere between the two. The best thing about these supercars is that you need complete concentration, total focus to drive them quickly. And that is a mental workout in itself. There is no curve, corner, hairpin or chicane it doesn’t like. As for too much of a good thing? The 12-year-old me, the one who would buy this car, isn’t worried about that. More ice cream, please!
  19. Link: https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/lamborghini/lp-640-4-performante-2dr-ldf/first-drive Wow, the Huracan Performante Spyder. Just the sort of car that car fans love, and you journalists love to hate. I thought this was Top Gear telling you what we think, not you telling us what we think. The Performante is one of the cleverest aero cars in the world, but this is an aerodynamically compromised version of it. It’s a 125kg heavier version of a car that’s been engineered to save weight. So you could argue it’s ‘impure’, and it certainly undermines some of its own logic. But it’d be wrong to say I don’t like it. It’s fabulous and adorable. You’re not going to quote Nürburgring times at me? Nope. It’s true the hard-roofed Performante is a phenomenon at the Nordschleife, doing a 6m52s and beating the hypercars. And sure, it achieved this partly because of its aerodynamic system. But that’s not what the Spyder is about. It’s a road car. It’s got number plates and lights. And a ‘Strada’ mode Which does what? Like any self-respecting mode switch these days, it affects the throttle map and the adaptive dampers, and the front-rear torque split. The ‘Sport’ and ‘Corsa’ modes also open the loud valves in the exhaust system at lower revs, but of course that adds no real performance for the exact reason that full power happens only at high revs. But this being a Performante, the mode button has two special tricks. First is the actively geared steering (optional but fitted in this car), so in the aggressive modes you move the wheel less for the same amount of steering lock. Second trick is the active aero system. In the Strada mode, the front and rear aero are set in for max downforce. Whereas in the other modes they can be stalled, saving drag but cutting downforce. The stalling is done by small hidden flaps, which is faster and lighter than moving the whole wing, if less theatrical. They can do that asymmetrically, to nudge the car into a turn. But that sort of aero trickery needs big speeds – track speeds. And the Spyder’s roof? Weatherproof when raised. And there’s a good reversing camera for parking. But that’s not why you asked. It drops at up to 30mph without you doing any more than holding the switch. At bigger speed, cockpit buffeting is well under control, so there’s no reason to raise the thing unless in a downpour. With it down, you get even deeper into the sensation of speed the Huracan provides. It’s a road car, remember, so it’s about the sensation of speed, not the lap-timed measurement of speed. The rear screen, a small vertical glass panel, also operates under separate electric control, so you can keep it up as a wind deflector or drop for even more engine noise. Tell me about the engine… Lamborghini’s 5.2-litre V10 is hidden in the Spyder. The Performante coupe puts it on display under a transparent panel, all the better to enjoy the beauty of its gold-painted cast plenums. But even if it’s out of sight you won’t forget this engine. Performante-spec brings titanium valves, which are lighter and so can be made to lift higher, bringing more power. That’s 640bhp at 8,000rpm. The Performante has an instantaneous and infectious vivacity. Even in the middle revs it hurls the car ahead. Then, just at the point where your turbo-accustomed fingers are involuntarily moving towards the ‘up’ paddle at 6,000rpm, this awesome unblown engine takes on a whole new magnitude of urgency and pelts onward. It’s free and happy to spin at 8,500rpm, throttle butterflies admitting their air as predictably as atmospheric pressure dictates, and exhausts untrammelled by the muffling and inertia of turbines. The effect of this confection is an electrifying, affecting, unforgettable love song to natural aspiration. Sheer performance is brutal: 0-124mph in 9.3 seconds. So what if the Coupe can do it in 8.9? Open cars always feel faster. But open cars are floppier in bends… Not this one, not really. Any flex or top-heaviness is so marginal there’s no way it impinges on the cascade of other massages the car is giving. It disposes of curves majestically, never losing its level or its tenacity. Oh, and in a damp second-gear corner it’ll edge its tail out if you insist, especially in the more rear-biased Sport mode. But the drama is tidy. You won’t use Corsa mode on most British roads because it tightens the dampers so much. Also, I prefer the Strada mode’s lower-geared steering, because it means when your arms are knocked by a bump, the disturbance won’t jostle you into inputs that knock the car off course. The Performante’s springing is supple enough to breathe nicely over lumpy roads, but it hardly ever runs out of travel. And in all this, the tactile sensations are gorgeous. You touch the tyres, knowing how their grip changes as first the fronts, then the rears negotiate a bump or dip. The engine wires itself into your nerves and your cochlea. With the roof down, the effects of motion and sounds redouble themselves. Not just a rebodied Audi R8 then? Nope. It’s sharper, louder, quicker, more powerful, shorter in the wheelbase, and with its own clever systems including the aero and steering, and it uses more advanced composites. The only Audi things you notice are the sat nav and the mid-rev, mid-throttle 10-cylinder harmonics, both of which are more than satisfactory attributes taken from a more than satisfactory Audi supercar. The Lambo’s more expensive by miles too: £238,000, making it £100k more than an R8 Spyder. Exotic price for an exotic car. Anything to complain about? Yes, the fixed-back carbon-fibre bucket seats. They’re not racing chairs, they’re medieval instruments of torture. You’ll never walk again. Fortunately there’s a ‘comfort seat’ option. This or the coupe, then? Well, Lamborghini says that the active aero system still works properly in the Spyder. No doubt the car’s extra weight nibbles at straight-line and track speed. But if you want a road car, choosing the Spyder adds a whole other world of appeal. 9/10
  20. Link: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-lamborghini-huracan-performante-spyder-first-drive-review 2018 Lamborghini Huracán Performante Spyder It’s not all Prada sunglasses, spray tanning, and paisley dress shirts. JULY 2018 BY TONY QUIROGA VIEW 97 PHOTOS Drop the top of the Lamborghini Huracán Performante Spyder and you’re left with vastness above and a black-framed windshield ahead. Seeing out isn’t difficult, but the world is suddenly framed and defined by the little black box ahead of you. It’s sort of like peering through the viewfinder of a Hasselblad or the little rectangle that film directors make with their fingers when they’re trying to appear extra artsy. Looking at the world through the Huracán’s windshield changes your mood, edits out the irrelevant, and focuses your mind on what’s important. HIGHS Rip-roaring acceleration, response and grip outside the realm of most other cars, a transcendent experience. LOWS It can be hard not to bang off the rev limiter, screaming exhaust note combined with open-topped bodywork means the shy should not apply. The pavement seems to zoom right under the windshield in a way that makes 35 mph look like real speed. Not that the Performante Spyder needs to resort to any trickery. It’s seriously quick, and unleashing the rage of the 631-hp 5.2-liter V-10 at its 8500-rpm redline never ever gets old. Plucked from the Performante coupe, a 3429-pound missile that will hit 60 mph in 2.3 seconds and punch through the quarter-mile in 10.2 seconds at 136 mph, the V-10 is a naturally aspirated middle finger to a world gone turbo. VIEW 97 PHOTOS Goodbye, Yellow Brick Road We don’t expect the Spyder to be more than a tenth or two slower in most acceleration tests. A reinforced windshield, the electric folding soft top, and some new bodywork to accommodate the top add 276 pounds, according to Lamborghini. The engine, which sits under glass in the coupe, is hidden from view in the Spyder by a cover that protects the folded top from immolation. As in the coupe, a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic provides launch control that brings the revs to 4500 rpm before the clutch engages and the all-wheel-drive system does its thing. In this mode, the computer takes care of the upshifts and it’s goodbye, yellow brick road. The transmission won’t upshift on its own in manual mode or when in Corsa, the most aggressive driving mode. Instead, it’ll relentlessly pound into the rev limiter. Having to do redline upshifts is something that makes track driving trickier since a perfectly timed tug of the column-mounted paddle is required to extract the most out of the Spyder. Do it early and you’ve lost some acceleration; do it even a split-second late and you’re in the rev limiter. Many brands offer the possibility of an automatic upshift at redline and are programmed to not perform midcorner upshifts, but this car makes you do the shifting. It’d certainly be a bit easier if Lamborghini provided shift lights on the steering wheel like Ferrari and BMW do, because in the first couple of gears, the V-10 spins like a boat engine without a propeller. Rev limiter, here we come. VIEW 97 PHOTOS On the roads that cut in and out of the Napa Valley in Northern California, the Spyder has the brashness of a despot who just got access to nuclear weapons. In Sport and Corsa modes, the exhaust flaps stay open at all times and the V-10 goes from merely loud to don’t-tell-OSHA. After a lucrative career at Kellogg’s, Snap, Crackle, and Pop appear to have left their jobs to tune the sound of the Performante’s exhaust on the overrun. Getting to hear the burning of every fuel molecule is why you buy the convertible version and put up with the roughly 13 percent price increase—the Performante Spyder opens at $314,654. If you’re uncomfortable drawing attention to yourself, the Lambo’s design and its screaming exhaust might be a bit much. Not to worry; it’s no more embarrassing than admitting you’ve seen Stomp, Nickelback, Dane Cook, or Coldplay. Or all four. Sexy Specs Driving fast in the Performante Spyder shrinks the universe into the space of that windshield frame. Although the steering column will occasionally quiver, there’s no other clue that you’re in the open version. Careful suspension tuning to compensate for the greater weight over the rear wheels makes the Spyder feel exactly like the coupe. Light steering efforts bring forth an easy and quick turn-in that masks the width and overall size of the Spyder. The front tires communicate their grip levels clearly through the steering wheel. The active aero ALA system opens and closes vents to provide downforce where and when you need it. There’s so much grip and performance that when you get back into a lesser car, you’ll find yourself squealing the tires around the first few corners before you return to reality. We’d call it the Go-Kart Effect because every time we drive a go-kart and get back into a street car the first thing we do is almost go off at the first corner. The active aerodynamics, brake-based torque vectoring, and stability-control programming are especially impressive because all systems work in harmony. The Performante Spyder experience is perfectly cohesive and natural. Its gestalt is transcendent. And you thought driving a Lamborghini was all Prada sunglasses, spray tanning, and paisley dress shirts. Okay, well, it’s those things, too, but the Performante Spyder also has a soul-stirring greatness—and a windshield—that’ll reframe your world. Price Starting at $203,295
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