US/UK-Diablo

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About US/UK-Diablo

  • Birthday 10/03/1960

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    http://www.dndgalleries.com
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  1. US/UK-Diablo

    Recession coming?

    I find it interesting that no one is taking into account the federal debt and student loans. I don't know how or when but it seems to me that in the not to distant future this is all going to bite us in the ass. Up is not forever.
  2. US/UK-Diablo

    Self employed / heath insurance

    Count your blessings. I know several people - family of 2 - 1 child - paying $2,800 per month. I get health insurance through my wife's company (Merrill Lynch) who pays for 1/2 the premium. We have a premium policy, the most expensive you can opt for. We pay just over $1,000 a month so with Merrill's match for just the 2 of us comes in at about $24,000 a year. The only country on the planet where you can go bankrupt from medical bills.
  3. US/UK-Diablo

    Must see documentary.

    Can't wait to watch this!
  4. US/UK-Diablo

    Is anyone in the BITCOIN market?

    Here yu go. I think this will clear things up.
  5. No good dead goes unpunished. I was just trying to impart a bit of advice. I'm truly saddened by the vitriol. I wish you all good luck.
  6. I know many of you just want this thread to die or be deleted but I thought I'd pass this along. I spend a lot of time in the Cayman's. I also have a second home here and over the last 30+ years have a lot of local Caymanian friends. I'm currently down here for part of the winter and many of the locals are fcuking furious over the shithole comment. So what I'm imparting to you is if you're a Trump supporter keep it to yourself you'll get better service here. Take it for what you will.
  7. Just that he's a fcuking embarrassment. You can defend him all you want but you can't defend that he's not an embarrassment.
  8. In the current environment you should be happy you have any health insurance.
  9. I don't care about your political affiliation but I do believe in history. I’m a Depression historian. The GOP tax bill is straight out of 1929. - Historian Robert S. McElvaine teaches at Millsaps College. He is the author of "The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941" “There are two ideas of government,” William Jennings Bryan declared in his 1896 “Cross of Gold” speech. “There are those who believe that if you will only legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea, however, has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous their prosperity will find its way up through every class which rests upon them.” That was more than three decades before the collapse of the economy in 1929. The crash followed a decade of Republican control of the federal government during which trickle-down policies, including massive tax cuts for the rich, produced the greatest concentration of income in the accounts of the richest 0.01 percent at any time between World War I and 2007 (when trickle-down economics, tax cuts for the hyper-rich, and deregulation again resulted in another economic collapse). Yet the plain fact that the trickle-down approach has never worked leaves Republicans unfazed. The GOP has been singing from the Market-is-God hymnal for well over a century, telling us that deregulation, tax cuts for the rich, and the concentration of ever more wealth in the bloated accounts of the richest people will result in prosperity for the rest of us. The party is now trying to pass a scam that throws a few crumbs to the middle class (temporarily — millions of middle-class Americans will soon see a tax hike if the bill is enacted) while heaping benefits on the super-rich, multiplying the national debt and endangering the American economy. As a historian of the Great Depression, I can say: I’ve seen this show before. In 1926, Calvin Coolidge’s treasury secretary, Andrew Mellon, one of the world’s richest men, pushed through a massive tax cut that would substantially contribute to the causes of the Great Depression. Republican Sen. George Norris of Nebraska said that Mellon himself would reap from the tax bill “a larger personal reduction [in taxes] than the aggregate of practically all the taxpayers in the state of Nebraska.” The same is true now of Donald Trump, the Koch Brothers, Sheldon Adelson and other fabulously rich people. During the 1920s, Republicans almost literally worshiped business. “The business of America,” Coolidge proclaimed, “is business.” Coolidge also remarked that, “The man who builds a factory builds a temple,” and “the man who works there worships there.” That faith in the Market as God has been the Republican religion ever since. A few months after he became president in 1981, Ronald Reagan praised Coolidge for cutting “taxes four times” and said “we had probably the greatest growth in prosperity that we’ve ever known.” Reagan said nothing about what happened to “Coolidge Prosperity” a few months after he left office. In 1932, in the depths of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt called for “bold, persistent experimentation” and said: “It is common sense to take a method and try it; if it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.” The contrasting position of Republicans then and now is: Take the method and try it. If it fails, deny its failure and try it again. And again. And again. When Bill Clinton proposed a modest increase in the top marginal tax rate in his 1993 budget, every Republican voted against it. Trickle-down economists proclaimed that it would lead to economic disaster. But the tax increase on the wealthy was followed by one of the greatest periods of prosperity in American history and resulted in a budget surplus. When the Republicans came back into power in 2001, the administration of George W. Bush pushed the opposite policies, which had invariably produced calamity in the past. Predictably, that happened again in 2008. Just how disastrous would the proposed reincarnation of the failed Republican trickle-down policies of the past be for the American people and the future of the nation? A few ways: Repealing the estate tax, or, as Republicans have dubbed it, the “death tax.” But the estate tax is not a tax on the dead; it is a tax on their heirs. Repeal would reverse an important aspect of the American Revolution and establish an American hereditary aristocracy. If your estate is not above $11 million, your benefits from this portion of the GOP’s tax cut will be a nice round number: zero. Eliminating deductions for state and local taxes. The GOP has called these deductions favoritism for people who live in high-tax states. In fact, ending deductibility of state and local taxes would tax income that has already been taxed away from a taxpayer. It is, quite simply, double taxation. Repealing the Alternative Minimum Tax, which assures that wealthy people who hire accountants to find all the obscure ways to avoid taxes cannot escape taxation altogether. Repealing it would save Trump millions. Extending the “pass-through” provision to noncorporate businesses, including some 500 entities Trump owns. It would allow the owners of these businesses to pay taxes at 25 percent, instead of 39.9 percent. This provision would allow Wall Street fund managers, among other very wealthy people, to pay a lower tax rate than many middle-class Americans pay. Ending the deductibility of large medical expenses. Taxing waived tuition for college students, ending deductibility for student loan payments, and even disallowing teachers from deducting what they spend on school supplies for their students. Ending the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate, which would cause 13 million Americans to lose health insurance and result in much higher premiums for those who do get insurance through the exchanges. The Congressional Budget Office has indicated that, if enacted, the Republican tax bill may force deep cuts in Medicare through a generally unknown budget rule that its deficits would trigger. The analysis of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office found that people making less than $100,000 a year (approximately 80 percent of American households) will have their taxes increased while the millionaires and billionaires will make off like bandits. In the 1920s, Republicans were in full control of the federal government and used that power to pursue their objective to “make the well-to-do prosperous.” It didn’t “leak through on those below.” In that decade, the mass-production American economy became dependent on mass consumption. For it to work, the masses need a sufficient share of the national income to be able to consume what is being produced. Republican policies in the ’20s instead pushed to concentrate more of the income at the top. Nine decades later, Republicans are rushing to do it again — and they are sprinting toward an economic cliff. Another round of Government of the People, by the Republicans, for the super-rich will be catastrophic. The American people must call a halt before it’s too late.
  10. Today I got a driving (not parking) violation from Italy (I was there in early June) for apparently driving on a road that was meant for public transportation only. It was sent via signed return receipt but my mailman just dropped it in my mailbox I assume because he had no idea what to do with it as it was all in Italian. The fine appears to be about 110 Euros. I don't plan on being back in Italy for at least a few years. Not to be a dick but if I don't pay it just what could they do? The point here is not to save $150 but just what if I don't pay it what would happen. Or the next time I go back to Europe should I plan on being arrested and deported back to Italy to spend several years of hard labor in a dingy Sicilian prison having to survive on gruel and Cholera laced water?
  11. US/UK-Diablo

    Blade Runner 2049

    I love these type of films. In the end it's not "did they answer the question(s)" It's do I care - and I didn't.
  12. US/UK-Diablo

    Blade Runner 2049

  13. US/UK-Diablo

    Blade Runner 2049

    Loved it! Seen it yesterday. Yeah it's long but it didn't seem like it.