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The New Vacheron Constantin Historiques

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The 1948, with only 200 pieces produced, should be relatively ok; the 1942 will probably plummet, you're right. :)

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Theyre beautiful watches and one of the oldest watch houses but for some reason don't hold their values. The ultra thin overseas is a beautiful watch.. investment wise tho Patek and AP are still king I would say

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Theyre beautiful watches and one of the oldest watch houses but for some reason don't hold their values. The ultra thin overseas is a beautiful watch.. investment wise tho Patek and AP are still king I would say

 

Definitely beautiful, it’s really disappointing to hear that they don’t retain value.

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It’s all relative. Based on your posts and if I may be so bold, you seem to be willing to pay for what you like. If you really like a 20k watch, it’s probably not the end of the world if it’s immediately worth half.

 

Sometimes the market rewards and appreciates the best and sometimes it’s merely a herd mentality. I know I find comfort in liking things the herd does not.

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Agreed, if you have no intention of selling then you should buy what you like. I never buy with resale in mind but there is a satisfaction when you know what you have and enjoy is still appreciating.... also with watches sometimes its nice to trade in after a few years for something else.

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It’s all relative. Based on your posts and if I may be so bold, you seem to be willing to pay for what you like. If you really like a 20k watch, it’s probably not the end of the world if it’s immediately worth half.

 

Sometimes the market rewards and appreciates the best and sometimes it’s merely a herd mentality. I know I find comfort in liking things the herd does not.

[/quote

 

You are right I do adhere to that philosophy :icon_mrgreen:

 

I wouldn’t wear a dress watch very often but I would still like a nice one for those occasions but after talking with a very good friend who knows a lot about watches maybe this one isn’t the one to go for but rather a nice Patek.

 

I will have another good look if I ever see it in a boutique, in the photos it does look very nice, one thing which puts me off, I like the gold one but I dislike the brown strap, they might have an option to change it to black so that might not be a problem.

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Agreed, if you have no intention of selling then you should buy what you like. I never buy with resale in mind but there is a satisfaction when you know what you have and enjoy is still appreciating.... also with watches sometimes its nice to trade in after a few years for something else.

 

I don’t think I will ever sell any of my watches but still it’s nice to feel like you didn’t lose, I hate losing, it just shows you’ve made a poor decision and I don’t like that :icon_mrgreen:

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I don’t think I will ever sell any of my watches but still it’s nice to feel like you didn’t lose, I hate losing, it just shows you’ve made a poor decision and I don’t like that :icon_mrgreen:

 

A bit OT but Patek, IMO, likely has one of the best if not THE best advertising slogan ever:

“You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation.” Simple statement but profoundly valid if one thinks about it. And obviously screams reliability, longevity, quality and proper after-sale services without actually saying anything close to those. Pure genius!

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A bit OT but Patek, IMO, likely has one of the best if not THE best advertising slogan ever:

“You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation.” Simple statement but profoundly valid if one thinks about it. And obviously screams reliability, longevity, quality and proper after-sale services without actually saying anything close to those. Pure genius!

 

I like that slogan, if that's the case they should just rent the damn things out :icon_mrgreen:

 

 

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It is a fantastic slogan. Even the picture are always a bi-generational angle to it, i.e. mother-daughter, father-son, really driving the point home.

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At that price point , one should buy what they like . A 20k watch is not an investment, I don’t know of any Patel at this price that are nice and they definitely will not appreciate either . Any Patelk with a potential for appreciation is usually 200k+

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Vacheron is my favorite brand and I feel it is very under appreciated in the current era.

As mentioned, VC is the oldest watch manufacturer with rich horologic tradition and rightfully deserves its place in the Holy Trinity (with Patek and AP). The likes of Napolean and Truman donned VC pieces. I have a Historiques piece, a Toledo 1952 that I absolutely love and also a VC Overseas that I wear to work in a suit or in t shirts and jeans.

I do agree that VC doesn't retain the best value, but like an Aston Martin, has to be bought right. The Overseas piece I bought new from an AD with about 20% discount. I've had a previous Patrimony 31 day retrograde that I bought and sold for about the same money.

Everyone knows a Patek or an AP but it seems few but a WIS will chat about a VC piece. If you are interested in a wealth of information about VC, check out the forum thehourlounge.com. Those guys are extremely passionate and knowledgeable about VC!

I'd post pics but there seems to be a glitch with iPhones

 

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I think the issue with VC is that they have been and still are overly conservative. Yes, their design is elegant and timeless but on the flip side, they aren’t innovative at all. They likely have the greatest skills on skeletal movements out of the Holy Trinity. They are more than capable to make calibres of complications of all sorts but nothing is really new at all. Perhaps their newest showpiece, the Métiers d’Art Copernicus Celestial Spheres 2460 RT, is the only exception. Other than that, the Marco Polo and the Mercator were/are as refreshing as they had gotten (the quad-window of the Chinese zodiacs collection isn’t really new; nor is the Marco Polo in fact). Yes, there is the old say, “if it ain’t broken...” but VC never quite had a piece that wowed the crowd like Patek would nor did it have a series like AP’s ROO that are favoured by many including some members here. And VC’s are so elegant at times that they appear fragile; which, regrettably, some are indeed quite fragile. Please don’t get me wrong, I like VC a lot; picked up a few pieces over the years; but compared to the other two greats, it somehow falls just a tiny bit short which really is a shame and a pity.

 

I concur and like the analogy of VC is similar to the Aston Martin. Great point!

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I concur and like the analogy of VC is similar to the Aston Martin. Great point!

 

I've always kind of thought of Rolex as the "Porsche of watches", but hadn't thought of how the other brands correspond.

 

Does that make Lambo the AP and Ferrari the Patek of the watch-trinity?

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At that price point , one should buy what they like . A 20k watch is not an investment, I don’t know of any Patel at this price that are nice and they definitely will not appreciate either . Any Patelk with a potential for appreciation is usually 200k+

 

What would be an investment under 20k then? Because I've heard there are people who DO make a living flipping Rolexes, so either they know how to continuously buy low or Rolex's do appreciate?

 

 

I've always kind of thought of Rolex as the "Porsche of watches", but hadn't thought of how the other brands correspond.

 

Does that make Lambo the AP and Ferrari the Patek of the watch-trinity?

 

Sounds more like a case of trying to take a metaphor where it does no longer fit.

 

 

A bit OT but Patek, IMO, likely has one of the best if not THE best advertising slogan ever:

“You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation.” Simple statement but profoundly valid if one thinks about it. And obviously screams reliability, longevity, quality and proper after-sale services without actually saying anything close to those. Pure genius!

 

 

Got 20 mins? Have fun.

 

 

https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2011/11/lux...future_lea.html

 

 

Want to go buy a $10000 watch? "In 2009-14? Hell yeah, let me get my coat."

 

Watches have the same problem diamond jewelry has; it better be beautiful enough to keep forever, because if you try and sell it you'll discover there is no secondary market for it. No one wants the necklace your ex had waiting for you when you got back from Cozumel. "I've been doing a lot of thinking," he says, "about how easy it would be for you to get all the penis you want. Let's get married and make sure neither of us are ever happy. No, no, moving closer to your parents doesn't sound like a bad idea." Turning it into an heirloom keeps it out of the market and the supply stays regulated by the manufacturers, which I think is collusion but I'm no lawyer.

 

These ads can be seen in whatever rich people use to relax on Sunday afternoons, e.g. The Economist.

 

This is a brilliant campaign, for technical and artistic reasons. What is the brand that it conveys? Heirloom quality.

 

The ads use black and white photos: we've been around for a long time. Even the advertising campaign self-referentially broadcasts this-- it has been the same since 1996, i.e. longer than a 40 year old has been in the market for an expensive watch to notice it wasn't always thus, reinforcing the longevity of the brand.

 

I know you probably figure this ad isn't for you because you're not a railroad baron or a Rothschild, but ask yourself a question: have you seen this ad? Then it's for you. Time to learn why they know you better than you know yourself.

 

 

The demo for this ad isn't the Rothschilds or the 1%: they don't buy based on ads. And they don't need to be told what constitutes quality or authenticity, they can tell, that's what boarding school was for. Everyone else is going to need to be hit over the head with the semiotics of quality--

 

i.e. see an ad campaign about those signifiers. Oh, I get it now, this is a fancy watch.

 

The target demo is not the 1%; the target demo is the Aspirational 14%. They know they are supposed to like quality and goodness and etiquette and discretion, but no one ever taught them what those things look like, so when someone does point it out to them they will go all in. Hence: anything in Trading Up. And they don't care about the next generation. Not really. They don't want them to be eaten by zombies but anything past 2069 is of no consequence. What they do care about is how a product brands them, what it says about them now, now that time is running out. Can't afford to be subtle, which is the same thing as saying I'm willing to pay $10000 to get the message across. There's a difference between what the brand is and what the brand says about you. You'll pay 10x for the former and 100x for the latter.

 

Most products have quick, easy, memorable taglines, because most people are idiots. However, Patek Philippe's tag line is complicated and unmemorizable:

 

You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely take care of it for the next generation.

 

Which is the kind of tagline a person who wants to be a wealthy, complicated, precise man who doesn't fall for tag lines would fall for. The man in the photo is not a representation of the target demo; he is the impossible aspiration of the target demo. That explains how the kid can be in a sweater vest and not trying to murder his family.

 

The ad is pairing the legacy of the watch with the other imaginary legacy: the heritable family fortune. I don't know what the Dad in that picture does for a living, but you can be sure it involves a lot of money and the son will inherit it, along with a boat (below) and the means of production (not pictured).

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I've always kind of thought of Rolex as the "Porsche of watches", but hadn't thought of how the other brands correspond.

 

Does that make Lambo the AP and Ferrari the Patek of the watch-trinity?

Even though they are a Ferrari sponsor, I always thought of Hublot as the Lambo of watches.

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I've always kind of thought of Rolex as the "Porsche of watches", but hadn't thought of how the other brands correspond.

 

Does that make Lambo the AP and Ferrari the Patek of the watch-trinity?

 

I’ve ALWAYS thought this about Rolex being analogous to Porsche.....EVERYBODY has one. It’s for the sheeple and the masses.

If I were to get a Rolex it would have to be very special like a 6263.

Agree with Lambo and AP as well....flashy with presence.

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What would be an investment under 20k then? Because I've heard there are people who DO make a living flipping Rolexes, so either they know how to continuously buy low or Rolex's do appreciate?

 

 

 

 

Sounds more like a case of trying to take a metaphor where it does no longer fit.

 

 

 

 

 

Got 20 mins? Have fun.

 

 

https://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2011/11/lux...future_lea.html

 

What would you rate as making a living. You would need to be a dealer and be able to buy the watches wholesale and/or used . There is not that much margin to play with on a sub 20k watch, assume you can make 2k a watch, hardly an investment and the likelihood of that watch being worth much more that it's MSRP is not that high, although possible. Think of how many watches you would need to buy and flip to make a living and it has now become an active business and not an investment.

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